Bitcoin Rich List - View the Top 100 Richest Bitcoin ...

Your Guide to Monero, and Why It Has Great Potential

/////Your Guide to Monero, and Why It Has Great Potential/////

Marketing.
It's a dirty word for most members of the Monero community.
It is also one of the most divisive words in the Monero community. Yet, the lack of marketing is one of the most frustrating things for many newcomers.
This is what makes this an unusual post from a member of the Monero community.
This post is an unabashed and unsolicited analyzation of why I believe Monero to have great potential.
Below I have attempted to outline different reasons why Monero has great potential, beginning with upcoming developments and use cases, to broader economic motives, speculation, and key issues for it to overcome.
I encourage you to discuss and criticise my musings, commenting below if you feel necessary to do so.

///Upcoming Developments///

Bulletproofs - A Reduction in Transaction Sizes and Fees
Since the introduction of Ring Confidential Transactions (Ring CT), transaction amounts have been hidden in Monero, albeit at the cost of increased transaction fees and sizes. In order to mitigate this issue, Bulletproofs will soon be added to reduce both fees and transaction size by 80% to 90%. This is great news for those transacting smaller USD amounts as people commonly complained Monero's fees were too high! Not any longer though! More information can be found here. Bulletproofs are already working on the Monero testnet, and developers were aiming to introduce them in March 2018, however it could be delayed in order to ensure everything is tried and tested.
Multisig
Multisig has recently been merged! Mulitsig, also called multisignature, is the requirement for a transaction to have two or more signatures before it can be executed. Multisig transactions and addresses are indistinguishable from normal transactions and addresses in Monero, and provide more security than single-signature transactions. It is believed this will lead to additional marketplaces and exchanges to supporting Monero.
Kovri
Kovri is an implementation of the Invisible Internet Project (I2P) network. Kovri uses both garlic encryption and garlic routing to create a private, protected overlay-network across the internet. This overlay-network provides users with the ability to effectively hide their geographical location and internet IP address. The good news is Kovri is under heavy development and will be available soon. Unlike other coins' false privacy claims, Kovri is a game changer as it will further elevate Monero as the king of privacy.
Mobile Wallets
There is already a working Android Wallet called Monerujo available in the Google Play Store. X Wallet is an IOS mobile wallet. One of the X Wallet developers recently announced they are very, very close to being listed in the Apple App Store, however are having some issues with getting it approved. The official Monero IOS and Android wallets, along with the MyMonero IOS and Android wallets, are also almost ready to be released, and can be expected very soon.
Hardware Wallets
Hardware wallets are currently being developed and nearing completion. Because Monero is based on the CryptoNote protocol, it means it requires unique development in order to allow hardware wallet integration. The Ledger Nano S will be adding Monero support by the end of Q1 2018. There is a recent update here too. Even better, for the first time ever in cryptocurrency history, the Monero community banded together to fund the development of an exclusive Monero Hardware Wallet, and will be available in Q2 2018, costing only about $20! In addition, the CEO of Trezor has offered a 10BTC bounty to whoever can provide the software to allow Monero integration. Someone can be seen to already be working on that here.
TAILS Operating System Integration
Monero is in the progress of being packaged in order for it to be integrated into TAILS and ready to use upon install. TAILS is the operating system popularised by Edward Snowden and is commonly used by those requiring privacy such as journalists wanting to protect themselves and sources, human-right defenders organizing in repressive contexts, citizens facing national emergencies, domestic violence survivors escaping from their abusers, and consequently, darknet market users.
In the meantime, for those users who wish to use TAILS with Monero, u/Electric_sheep01 has provided Sheep's Noob guide to Monero GUI in Tails 3.2, which is a step-by-step guide with screenshots explaining how to setup Monero in TAILS, and is very easy to follow.
Mandatory Hardforks
Unlike other coins, Monero receives a protocol upgrade every 6 months in March and September. Think of it as a Consensus Protocol Update. Monero's hard forks ensure quality development takes place, while preventing political or ideological issues from hindering progress. When a hardfork occurs, you simply download and use the new daemon version, and your existing wallet files and copy of the blockchain remain compatible. This reddit post provides more information.
Dynamic fees
Many cryptocurrencies have an arbitrary block size limit. Although Monero has a limit, it is adaptive based on the past 100 blocks. Similarly, fees change based on transaction volume. As more transactions are processed on the Monero network, the block size limit slowly increases and the fees slowly decrease. The opposite effect also holds true. This means that the more transactions that take place, the cheaper the fees!
Tail Emission and Inflation
There will be around 18.4 million Monero mined at the end of May 2022. However, tail emission will kick in after that which is 0.6 XMR, so it has no fixed limit. Gundamlancer explains that Monero's "main emission curve will issue about 18.4 million coins to be mined in approximately 8 years. (more precisely 18.132 Million coins by ca. end of May 2022) After that, a constant "tail emission" of 0.6 XMR per 2-minutes block (modified from initially equivalent 0.3 XMR per 1-minute block) will create a sub-1% perpetual inflatio starting with 0.87% yearly inflation around May 2022) to prevent the lack of incentives for miners once a currency is not mineable anymore.
Monero Research Lab
Monero has a group of anonymous/pseudo-anonymous university academics actively researching, developing, and publishing academic papers in order to improve Monero. See here and here. The Monero Research Lab are acquainted with other members of cryptocurrency academic community to ensure when new research or technology is uncovered, it can be reviewed and decided upon whether it would be beneficial to Monero. This ensures Monero will always remain a leading cryptocurrency. A recent end of 2017 update from a MRL researcher can be found here.

///Monero's Technology - Rising Above The Rest///

Monero Has Already Proven Itself To Be Private, Secure, Untraceable, and Trustless
Monero is the only private, untraceable, trustless, secure and fungible cryptocurrency. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are TRACEABLE through the use of blockchain analytics, and has lead to the prosecution of numerous individuals, such as the alleged Alphabay administrator Alexandre Cazes. In the Forfeiture Complaint which detailed the asset seizure of Alexandre Cazes, the anonymity capabilities of Monero were self-demonstrated by the following statement of the officials after the AlphaBay shutdown: "In total, from CAZES' wallets and computer agents took control of approximately $8,800,000 in Bitcoin, Ethereum, Monero and Zcash, broken down as follows: 1,605.0503851 Bitcoin, 8,309.271639 Ethereum, 3,691.98 Zcash, and an unknown amount of Monero".
Privacy CANNOT BE OPTIONAL and must be at a PROTOCOL LEVEL. With Monero, privacy is mandatory, so that everyone gets the benefits of privacy without any transactions standing out as suspicious. This is the reason Darknet Market places are moving to Monero, and will never use Verge, Zcash, Dash, Pivx, Sumo, Spectre, Hush or any other coins that lack good privacy. Peter Todd (who was involved in the Zcash trusted setup ceremony) recently reiterated his concerns of optional privacy after Jeffrey Quesnelle published his recent paper stating 31.5% of Zcash transactions may be traceable, and that only ~1% of the transactions are pure privacy transactions (i.e., z -> z transactions). When the attempted private transactions stand out like a sore thumb there is no privacy, hence why privacy cannot be optional. In addition, in order for a cryptocurrency to truly be private, it must not be controlled by a centralised body, such as a company or organisation, because it opens it up to government control and restrictions. This is no joke, but Zcash is supported by DARPA and the Israeli government!.
Monero provides a stark contrast compared to other supposed privacy coins, in that Monero does not have a rich list! With all other coins, you can view wallet balances on the blockexplorers. You can view Monero's non-existent rich list here to see for yourself.
I will reiterate here that Monero is TRUSTLESS. You don't need to rely on anyone else to protect your privacy, or worry about others colluding to learn more about you. No one can censor your transaction or decide to intervene. Monero is immutable, unlike Zcash, in which the lead developer Zooko publicly tweeted the possibility of providing a backdoor for authorities to trace transactions. To Zcash's demise, Zooko famously tweeted:
" And by the way, I think we can successfully make Zcash too traceable for criminals like WannaCry, but still completely private & fungible. …"
Ethereum's track record of immutability is also poor. Ethereum was supposed to be an immutable blockchain ledger, however after the DAO hack this proved to not be the case. A 2016 article on Saintly Law summarised the problematic nature of Ethereum's leadership and blockchain intervention:
" Many ethereum and blockchain advocates believe that the intervention was the wrong move to make in this situation. Smart contracts are meant to be self-executing, immutable and free from disturbance by organisations and intermediaries. Yet the building block of all smart contracts, the code, is inherently imperfect. This means that the technology is vulnerable to the same malicious hackers that are targeting businesses and governments. It is also clear that the large scale intervention after the DAO hack could not and would not likely be taken in smaller transactions, as they greatly undermine the viability of the cryptocurrency and the technology."
Monero provides Fungibility and Privacy in a Cashless World
As outlined on GetMonero.org, fungibility is the property of a currency whereby two units can be substituted in place of one another. Fungibility means that two units of a currency can be mutually substituted and the substituted currency is equal to another unit of the same size. For example, two $10 bills can be exchanged and they are functionally identical to any other $10 bill in circulation (although $10 bills have unique ID numbers and are therefore not completely fungible). Gold is probably a closer example of true fungibility, where any 1 oz. of gold of the same grade is worth the same as another 1 oz. of gold. Monero is fungible due to the nature of the currency which provides no way to link transactions together nor trace the history of any particular XMR. 1 XMR is functionally identical to any other 1 XMR. Fungibility is an advantage Monero has over Bitcoin and almost every other cryptocurrency, due to the privacy inherent in the Monero blockchain and the permanently traceable nature of the Bitcoin blockchain. With Bitcoin, any BTC can be tracked by anyone back to its creation coinbase transaction. Therefore, if a coin has been used for an illegal purpose in the past, this history will be contained in the blockchain in perpetuity.
A great example of Bitcoin's lack of fungibility was reposted by u/ViolentlyPeaceful:
"Imagine you sell cupcakes and receive Bitcoin as payment. It turns out that someone who owned that Bitcoin before you was involved in criminal activity. Now you are worried that you have become a suspect in a criminal case, because the movement of funds to you is a matter of public record. You are also worried that certain Bitcoins that you thought you owned will be considered ‘tainted’ and that others will refuse to accept them as payment."
This lack of fungibility means that certain businesses will be obligated to avoid accepting BTC that have been previously used for purposes which are illegal, or simply run afoul of their Terms of Service. Currently some large Bitcoin companies are blocking, suspending, or closing accounts that have received Bitcoin used in online gambling or other purposes deemed unsavory by said companies. Monero has been built specifically to address the problem of traceability and non-fungibility inherent in other cryptocurrencies. By having completely private transactions Monero is truly fungible and there can be no blacklisting of certain XMR, while at the same time providing all the benefits of a secure, decentralized, permanent blockchain.
The world is moving cashless. Fact. The ramifications of this are enormous as we move into a cashless world in which transactions will be tracked and there is a potential for data to be used by third parties for adverse purposes. While most new cryptocurrency investors speculate upon vaporware ICO tokens in the hope of generating wealth, Monero provides salvation for those in which financial privacy is paramount. Too often people equate Monero's features with criminal endeavors. Privacy is not a crime, and is necessary for good money. Transparency in Monero is possible OFF-CHAIN, which offers greater transparency and flexibility. For example, a Monero user may share their Private View Key with their accountant for tax purposes.
Monero aims to be adopted by more than just those with nefarious use cases. For example, if you lived in an oppressive religious regime and wanted to buy a certain item, using Monero would allow you to exchange value privately and across borders if needed. Another example is that if everybody can see how much cryptocurrency you have in your wallet, then a certain service might decide to charge you more, and bad actors could even use knowledge of your wallet balance to target you for extortion purposes. For example, a Russian cryptocurrency blogger was recently beaten and robbed of $425k. This is why FUNGIBILITY IS ESSENTIAL. To summarise this in a nutshell:
"A lack of fungibility means that when sending or receiving funds, if the other person personally knows you during a transaction, or can get any sort of information on you, or if you provide a residential address for shipping etc. – you could quite potentially have them use this against you for personal gain"
For those that wish to seek more information about why Monero is a superior form of money, read The Merits of Monero: Why Monero Vs Bitcoin over on the Monero.how website.
Monero's Humble Origins
Something that still rings true today despite the great influx of money into cryptocurrencies was outlined in Nick Tomaino's early 2016 opinion piece. The author claimed that "one of the most interesting aspects of Monero is that the project has gained traction without a crowd sale pre-launch, without VC funding and any company or well-known investors and without a pre-mine. Like Bitcoin in the early days, Monero has been a purely grassroots movement that was bootstrapped by the creator and adopted organically without any institutional buy-in. The creator and most of the core developers serve the community pseudonymously and the project was launched on a message board (similar to the way Bitcoin was launched on an email newsletter)."
The Organic Growth of the Monero Community
The Monero community over at monero is exponentially growing. You can view the Monero reddit metrics here and see that the Monero subreddit currently gains more than 10,000 (yes, ten thousand!) new subscribers every 10 days! Compare this to most of the other coins out there, and it proves to be one of the only projects with real organic growth. In addition to this, the community subreddits are specifically divided to ensure the main subreddit remains unbiased, tech focused, with no shilling or hype. All trading talk is designated to xmrtrader, and all memes at moonero.
Forum Funding System
While most contributors have gratefully volunteered their time to the project, Monero also has a Forum Funding System in which money is donated by community members to ensure it attracts and retains the brightest minds and most skilled developers. Unlike ICOs and other cryptocurrencies, Monero never had a premine, and does not have a developer tax. If ANYONE requires funding for a Monero related project, then they can simply request funding from the community, and if the community sees it as beneficial, they will donate. Types of projects range from Monero funding for local meet ups, to paying developers for their work.
Monero For Goods, Services, and Market Places
There is a growing number of online goods and services that you can now pay for with Monero. Globee is a service that allows online merchants to accept payments through credit cards and a host of cryptocurrencies, while being settled in Bitcoin, Monero or fiat currency. Merchants can reach a wider variety of customers, while not needing to invest in additional hardware to run cryptocurrency wallets or accept the current instability of the cryptocurrency market. Globee uses all of the open source API's that BitPay does making integrations much easier!
Project Coral Reef is a service which allows you to shop and pay for popular music band products and services using Monero.
Linux, Veracrypt, and a whole array of VPNs now accept Monero.
There is a new Monero only marketplace called Annularis currently being developed which has been created for those who value financial privacy and economic freedom, and there are rumours Open Bazaar is likely to support Monero once Multisig is implemented.
In addition, Monero is also supported by The Living Room of Satoshi so you can pay bills or credit cards directly using Monero.
Monero can be found on a growing number of cryptocurrency exchange services such as Bittrex, Poloniex, Cryptopia, Shapeshift, Changelly, Bitfinex, Kraken, Bisq, Tux, and many others.
For those wishing to purchase Monero anonymously, there are services such as LocalMonero.co and Moneroforcash.com.
With XMR.TO you can pay Bitcoin addresses directly with Monero. There are no other fees than the miner ones. All user records are purged after 48 hours. XMR.TO has also been added as an embedded feature into the Monerujo android wallet.
Coinhive Browser-Based Mining
Unlike Bitcoin, Monero can be mined using CPUs and GPUs. Not only does this encourage decentralisation, it also opens the door to browser based mining. Enter side of stage, Coinhive browser-based mining. As described by Hon Lau on the Symnatec Blog Browser-based mining, as its name suggests, is a method of cryptocurrency mining that happens inside a browser and is implemented using Javascript. Coinhive is marketed as an alternative to browser ad revenue. The motivation behind this is simple: users pay for the content indirectly by coin mining when they visit the site and website owners don't have to bother users with sites laden with ads, trackers, and all the associated paraphern. This is great, provided that the websites are transparent with site visitors and notify users of the mining that will be taking place, or better still, offer users a way to opt in, although this hasn't always been the case thus far.
Skepticism Sunday
The main Monero subreddit has weekly Skepticism Sundays which was created with the purpose of installing "a culture of being scientific, skeptical, and rational". This is used to have open, critical discussions about monero as a technology, it's economics, and so on.

///Speculation///

Major Investors And Crypto Figureheads Are Interested
Ari Paul is the co-founder and CIO of BlockTower Capital. He was previously a portfolio manager for the University of Chicago's $8 billion endowment, and a derivatives market maker and proprietary trader for Susquehanna International Group. Paul was interviewed on CNBC on the 26th of December and when asked what was his favourite coin was, he stated "One that has real fundamental value besides from Bitcoin is Monero" and said it has "very strong engineering". In addition, when he was asked if that was the one used by criminals, he replied "Everything is used by criminals including the US dollar and the Euro". Paul later supported these claims on Twitter, recommending only Bitcoin and Monero as long-term investments.
There are reports that "Roger Ver, earlier known as 'Bitcoin Jesus' for his evangelical support of the Bitcoin during its early years, said his investment in Monero is 'substantial' and his biggest in any virtual currency since Bitcoin.
Charlie Lee, the creator of Litecoin, has publicly stated his appreciation of Monero. In a September 2017 tweet directed to Edward Snowden explaining why Monero is superior to Zcash, Charlie Lee tweeted:
All private transactions, More tested privacy tech, No tax on miners to pay investors, No high inflation... better investment.
John McAfee, arguably cryptocurrency's most controversial character at the moment, has publicly supported Monero numerous times over the last twelve months(before he started shilling ICOs), and has even claimed it will overtake Bitcoin.
Playboy instagram celebrity Dan Bilzerian is a Monero investor, with 15% of his portfolio made up of Monero.
Finally, while he may not be considered a major investor or figurehead, Erik Finman, a young early Bitcoin investor and multimillionaire, recently appeared in a CNBC Crypto video interview, explaining why he isn't entirely sold on Bitcoin anymore, and expresses his interest in Monero, stating:
"Monero is a really good one. Monero is an incredible currency, it's completely private."
There is a common belief that most of the money in cryptocurrency is still chasing the quick pump and dumps, however as the market matures, more money will flow into legitimate projects such as Monero. Monero's organic growth in price is evidence smart money is aware of Monero and gradually filtering in.
The Bitcoin Flaw
A relatively unknown blogger named CryptoIzzy posted three poignant pieces regarding Monero and its place in the world. The Bitcoin Flaw: Monero Rising provides an intellectual comparison of Monero to other cryptocurrencies, and Valuing Cryptocurrencies: An Approach outlines methods of valuing different coins.
CryptoIzzy's most recent blog published only yesterday titled Monero Valuation - Update and Refocus is a highly recommended read. It touches on why Monero is much more than just a coin for the Darknet Markets, and provides a calculated future price of Monero.
CryptoIzzy also published The Power of Money: A Case for Bitcoin, which is an exploration of our monetary system, and the impact decentralised cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Monero will have on the world. In the epilogue the author also provides a positive and detailed future valuation based on empirical evidence. CryptoIzzy predicts Monero to easily progress well into the four figure range.
Monero Has a Relatively Small Marketcap
Recently we have witnessed many newcomers to cryptocurrency neglecting to take into account coins' marketcap and circulating supply, blindly throwing money at coins under $5 with inflated marketcaps and large circulating supplies, and then believing it's possible for them to reach $100 because someone posted about it on Facebook or Reddit.
Compared to other cryptocurrencies, Monero still has a low marketcap, which means there is great potential for the price to multiply. At the time of writing, according to CoinMarketCap, Monero's marketcap is only a little over $5 billion, with a circulating supply of 15.6 million Monero, at a price of $322 per coin.
For this reason, I would argue that this is evidence Monero is grossly undervalued. Just a few billion dollars of new money invested in Monero can cause significant price increases. Monero's marketcap only needs to increase to ~$16 billion and the price will triple to over $1000. If Monero's marketcap simply reached ~$35 billion (just over half of Ripple's $55 billion marketcap), Monero's price will increase 600% to over $2000 per coin.
Another way of looking at this is Monero's marketcap only requires ~$30 billion of new investor money to see the price per Monero reach $2000, while for Ethereum to reach $2000, Ethereum's marketcap requires a whopping ~$100 billion of new investor money.
Technical Analysis
There are numerous Monero technical analysts, however none more eerily on point than the crowd-pleasing Ero23. Ero23's charts and analysis can be found on Trading View. Ero23 gained notoriety for his long-term Bitcoin bull chart published in February, which is still in play today. Head over to his Trading View page to see his chart: Monero's dwindling supply. $10k in 2019 scenario, in which Ero23 predicts Monero to reach $10,000 in 2019. There is also this chart which appears to be freakishly accurate and is tracking along perfectly today.
Coinbase Rumours
Over the past 12 months there have been ongoing rumours that Monero will be one of the next cryptocurrencies to be added to Coinbase. In January 2017, Monero Core team member Riccardo 'Fluffypony' Spagni presented a talk at Coinbase HQ. In addition, in November 2017 GDAX announced the GDAX Digit Asset Framework outlining specific parameters cryptocurrencies must meet in order to be added to the exchange. There is speculation that when Monero has numerous mobile and hardware wallets available, and multisig is working, then it will be added. This would enable public accessibility to Monero to increase dramatically as Coinbase had in excess of 13 million users as of December, and is only going to grow as demand for cryptocurrencies increases. Many users argue that due to KYC/AML regulations, Coinbase will never be able to add Monero, however the Kraken exchange already operates in the US and has XMfiat pairs, so this is unlikely to be the reason Coinbase is yet to implement XMfiat trading.
Monero Is Not an ICO Scam
It is likely most of the ICOs which newcomers invest in, hoping to get rich quick, won't even be in the Top 100 cryptocurrencies next year. A large portion are most likely to be pumps and dumps, and we have already seen numerous instances of ICO exit scams. Once an ICO raises millions of dollars, the developers or CEO of the company have little incentive to bother rolling out their product or service when they can just cash out and leave. The majority of people who create a company to provide a service or product, do so in order to generate wealth. Unless these developers and CEOs are committed and believed in their product or service, it's likely that the funds raised during the ICO will far exceed any revenue generated from real world use cases.
Monero is a Working Currency, Today
Monero is a working currency, here today.
The majority of so called cryptocurrencies that exist today are not true currencies, and do not aim to be. They are a token of exchange. They are like a share in a start-up company hoping to use blockchain technology to succeed in business. A crypto-assest is a more accurate name for coins such as Ethereum, Neo, Cardano, Vechain, etc.
Monero isn't just a vaporware ICO token that promises to provide a blockchain service in the future. It is not a platform for apps. It is not a pump and dump coin.
Monero is the only coin with all the necessary properties to be called true money.
Monero is private internet money.
Some even describe Monero as an online Swiss Bank Account or Bitcoin 2.0, and it is here to continue on from Bitcoin's legacy.
Monero is alleviating the public from the grips of banks, and protests the monetary system forced upon us.
Monero only achieved this because it is the heart and soul, and blood, sweat, and tears of the contributors to this project. Monero supporters are passionate, and Monero has gotten to where it is today thanks to its contributors and users.

///Key Issues for Monero to Overcome///

Scalability
While Bulletproofs are soon to be implemented in order to improve Monero's transaction sizes and fees, scalability is an issue for Monero that is continuously being assessed by Monero's researchers and developers to find the most appropriate solution. Ricardo 'Fluffypony' Spagni recently appeared on CNBC's Crypto Trader, and when asked whether Monero is scalable as it stands today, Spagni stated that presently, Monero's on-chain scaling is horrible and transactions are larger than Bitcoin's (because of Monero's privacy features), so side-chain scaling may be more efficient. Spagni elaborated that the Monero team is, and will always be, looking for solutions to an array of different on-chain and off-chain scaling options, such as developing a Mimblewimble side-chain, exploring the possibility of Lightning Network so atomic swaps can be performed, and Tumblebit.
In a post on the Monero subreddit from roughly a month ago, monero moderator u/dEBRUYNE_1 supports Spagni's statements. dEBRUYNE_1 clarifies the issue of scalability:
"In Bitcoin, the main chain is constrained and fees are ludicrous. This results in users being pushed to second layer stuff (e.g. sidechains, lightning network). Users do not have optionality in Bitcoin. In Monero, the goal is to make the main-chain accessible to everyone by keeping fees reasonable. We want users to have optionality, i.e., let them choose whether they'd like to use the main chain or second layer stuff. We don't want to take that optionality away from them."
When the Spagni CNBC video was recently linked to the Monero subreddit, it was met with lengthy debate and discussion from both users and developers. u/ferretinjapan summarised the issue explaining:
"Monero has all the mechanisms it needs to find the balance between transaction load, and offsetting the costs of miner infrastructure/profits, while making sure the network is useful for users. But like the interviewer said, the question is directed at "right now", and Fluffys right to a certain extent, Monero's transactions are huge, and compromises in blockchain security will help facilitate less burdensome transactional activity in the future. But to compare Monero to Bitcoin's transaction sizes is somewhat silly as Bitcoin is nowhere near as useful as monero, and utility will facilitate infrastructure building that may eventually utterly dwarf Bitcoin. And to equate scaling based on a node being run on a desktop being the only option for what classifies as "scalable" is also an incredibly narrow interpretation of the network being able to scale, or not. Given the extremely narrow definition of scaling people love to (incorrectly) use, I consider that a pretty crap question to put to Fluffy in the first place, but... ¯_(ツ)_/¯"
u/xmrusher also contributed to the discussion, comparing Bitcoin to Monero using this analogous description:
"While John is much heavier than Henry, he's still able to run faster, because, unlike Henry, he didn't chop off his own legs just so the local wheelchair manufacturer can make money. While Morono has much larger transactions then Bitcoin, it still scales better, because, unlike Bitcoin, it hasn't limited itself to a cripplingly tiny blocksize just to allow Blockstream to make money."
Setting up a wallet can still be time consuming
It's time consuming and can be somewhat difficult for new cryptocurrency users to set up their own wallet using the GUI wallet or the Command Line Wallet. In order to strengthen and further decentralize the Monero network, users are encouraged to run a full node for their wallet, however this can be an issue because it can take up to 24-48 hours for some users depending on their hard-drive and internet speeds. To mitigate this issue, users can run a remote node, meaning they can remotely connect their wallet to another node in order to perform transactions, and in the meantime continue to sync the daemon so in the future they can then use their own node.
For users that do run into wallet setup issues, or any other problems for that matter, there is an extremely helpful troubleshooting thread on the Monero subreddit which can be found here. And not only that, unlike some other cryptocurrency subreddits, if you ask a question, there is always a friendly community member who will happily assist you. Monero.how is a fantastic resource too!
Despite still being difficult to use, the user-base and price may increase dramatically once it is easier to use. In addition, others believe that when hardware wallets are available more users will shift to Monero.

///Conclusion///

I actually still feel a little shameful for promoting Monero here, but feel a sense of duty to do so.
Monero is transitioning into an unstoppable altruistic beast. This year offers the implementation of many great developments, accompanied by the likelihood of a dramatic increase in price.
I request you discuss this post, point out any errors I have made, or any information I may have neglected to include. Also, if you believe in the Monero project, I encourage you to join your local Facebook or Reddit cryptocurrency group and spread the word of Monero. You could even link this post there to bring awareness to new cryptocurrency users and investors.
I will leave you with an old on-going joke within the Monero community - Don't buy Monero - unless you have a use case for it of course :-) Just think to yourself though - Do I have a use case for Monero in our unpredictable Huxleyan society? Hint: The answer is ?
Edit: Added in the Tail Emission section, and noted Dan Bilzerian as a Monero investor. Also added information regarding the XMR.TO payment service. Added info about hardfork
submitted by johnfoss69 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

An Enormous List of Thing I'd Like to See in Watch Dogs 2 (if it happens)

These aren't in order of importance, just sorted by categories. Some ideas just have a few examples and can be expanded upon. This list is mostly gameplay changes; the story, characters, graphics, etc. aren't covered here. This list is massive, so if a category is boring the hell out of you, feel free to skip it but please check out the next one; not all of them contain huge changes.
HACKING
ADDITIONS:
CHANGES:
WEAPONS
ADDITIONS:
CHANGES:
As for the player's inventory:
COMBAT
ADDITIONS:
CHANGES:
SIDE MISSIONS
This is a big change, likely the biggest so far. Remove the current crime, gang hideout, and convoy systems entirely. Introduce the CtOS Alert. The CtOS Alert presents itself like a crime, giving only a location on the map. This location isn't preset like crimes; it can be in a ton of places, be different sizes, and move around. Arriving at the location, you will have to use your eyes and cameras to find out what kind of alert it is.
CRIME:
-A few people in the area have crime/victim probabilities. This is Chicago (or whatever city the sequel is in), more than one person per-block has a grudge for or from another person. The probabilities react to their proximity to a victim, if they pull out a firearm, or if they start shit-talking someone. The player will have to keep track of 2-3 people to see which one the perpetrator is. This one is inspired by Person of Interest.
HIDEOUTS:
CONVOYS:
And that's that. CtOS Alerts would be rarer than crimes are now, but not too rare, and there may be a few available at one time.
POLICE
ADDITIONS:
CHANGES:
NPCS
ADDITIONS:
CHANGES:
AIDEN PEARCE
HIGH REPUTATION:
LOW REPUTATION:
Neutral or volatile reputation could lead to a a mix of these, or they just won't occur.
GENERAL:
Coffee Shops: Coffee (Focus and sprint speed boost until you drain the focus or sprint for a total minute), Bagel (Damage threshold boost until damage is taken)
Fast Food: Soda (Same as coffee but diminished effect), Burger (Damage threshold boost until damage is taken, sprint speed nerf until you sprint for a total of 1 minute)
I'm not trying to turn this into a survival game here, there's no (No) [NO] {NO} need for some stupid hunger system. But the ability to sit down and eat would be appreciated.
CRAFTABLES
Add. More. Craftables. Seriously, 3 explosives, some pills, and a radio? How about:
MULTIPLAYER
By multiplayer, I mean invasions, not the other gametypes.
These changes, in my opinion, would reward players for hiding in plain sight and staying on the move instead of hiding behind dumpsters, since that would be a dead giveaway.
AND THAT'S IT
These are a few things, large and small, that I would be pleased to see in a sequel to Watch_Dogs. Of course more changes could and should be made, but overall I think these are pretty good. Let me know in the comments if these ideas are excellent, could be tweaked, or if I should never impose my horrible opinions on this forum for the remainder of my life. Also, please point out any typos, since I probably missed a few and I may elect to x-post this to /gaming or /games after reviewing their post guidelines.
Thanks for reading!
submitted by cdawgtv2 to watch_dogs [link] [comments]

[Table] IAmA: I am CloudFlare CEO and co-founder Matthew Prince, AMA

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-05-02
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
How is it possible to charge one flat rate to all customers despite the fact that some of them use a couple of TB's a month and other PB's? At a high level: People hate their cell phone providers because their bills are unpredictable. We don't want to be thought of like a cell phone provider.
The scale economics in our business are significant. Our primary variable cost is bandwidth. However, the rate at which bandwidth prices drop is very fast as you start to get to scale. We're now at the scale where we can peer off a significant portion of our traffic, making it effectively free to us. If we can continue to push bandwidth toward zero then it makes sense for us to not charge customers more based on that.
The other thing is that we get smarter about stopping threats with every request that routes through our network. If we charged for bandwidth then it would cause customers to potentially avoid routing traffic through us. That goes against the core value that we provide: effectively a neighborhood watch for the Internet.
Hi Matthew, what are your thoughts about the recent news surrounding the FCC's new net neutrality proposal? How do you think it will affect services like CloudFlare? We're watching the FCC's moves on Network Neutrality very closely. My cofounder Michelle (@zatlyn) sits on the Open Internet Advisory Committee for the FCC. CloudFlare is the only startup represented on the committee. We recently retained a DC lobbying firm in part to advocate for network neutrality and we hired our first in-house counsel out of Google and the FCC. This is an important issue for us.
It's hard to overstate the benefits an uncensored, open Internet has created for the world. We're strong proponents of preserving the principles of Network Neutrality that have allowed open innovation. If governments around the world start to chip away at those principles, I'm hopeful that CloudFlare can use our scale and size in the market in order to ensure our customers will still be as fast as possible around the world.
Would CloudFlare ever get involved in a peering dispute if it would mean a better internet in the long term, even though it might result in temporary performance problems? We negotiate peering agreements daily. There are occasionally disputes. But, generally, most of the world's ISPs are still open to reasonable peering with us.
Notice anything different about SSL on Link to blog.cloudflare.com ? (Hint: you shouldn't.) We just enabled something very, very cool. :-)
One of the things that is critical to get mass adoption of CloudFlare in highly secure environments like financial institutions is a way to handle SSL without us ever having to be trusted with our customers' SSL keys. We've built something that does that and it's now running on a handful of customers' sites as well as on portions of cloudflare.com (the blog included). That's all I can say for now, but it's pretty cool and we'll be talking about it a lot more in the next few months.
Don't tell me it's a solution to P=NP. Please. No, it's not.
Hey Matt! What qualities do you look for when you're hiring, and how does one maximise their chances to land an internship? :-) Link to www.cloudflare.com
What does a community evangelist do? Sets up AMAs. :-)
Do you think the danger from Heartbleed was overexaggerated? Why? Do you code at all any more, or do you have lackeys do do such menial work for you now? Generally, I think that a lot of these Internet vulnerabilities are overhyped. Heartbleed was an exception. It was literally like the plot of that bad Sandra Bullock movie "The Net." There was, effectively, a button that you could push on any server in the world to have it dump the contents of its memory. While everyone focused on it being a crypto vulnerability, the bigger risk continues to be stealing things like login session IDs. That wasn't hypothetical. People were doing it with major services like Yahoo Mail for days after the vulnerability was disclosed. My hunch is we'll still be finding problems created by Heartbleed 2 years from now.
WHen you started up CloudFlare, how far did you see it going? I don't code much anymore. Every once in a while I'll bang out a little Javascript or something in order to prototype something, but there's no way my coding skill is anywhere close to where it would need to be in order to program for CloudFlare.
Hmm. Don't know what my favorite startup is other than CloudFlare. One thing that has been fun is having young startups by the office to brainstorm. Michelle (@zatlyn) and I try and make time to help them out as there were a lot of people who did the same for us when we were getting started.
2) Railguns association. This is a must, we currently track associations in an Excel spreadsheet. That's pretty bad. Any idea when you might associate that in the partner portal? We want to allow root domains behind CloudFlare via partners. We've got a few different ways of doing that we're playing with. The challenge is we want to maintain flexibility to move customers between IPs in order to isolate them when there's an attack. Since the DNS RFC doesn't allow CNAMEs at the root, it makes it tricky. But we're working on it. I'm told the Railgun associations should be in the partner account portal relatively soon.
Hey Matthew - Are there any plans to provide security against state-sponsored APT attacks? With a massive network like CloudFlare, there may be an opportunity to track signatures and develop an enterprise product - any thoughts? We see what appear to be state-sponsored attacks quite often, although we spend more time on defense than we do on attribution so it's tough to really know the source of the attacks. Right now, for instance, there are news organizations on both side of the conflict in Ukraine using CloudFlare in order to stay online in the face of very large DDoS attacks. I agree with you that, over time, there's a lot we can do with our scale and data to better protect customers from more sophisticated attacks.
Did you write much of the original cloudflare code base?...if so, what was the most difficult thing about transitioning into your current non-coding role? What do the 3 remaining lines you wrote in CloudFlare do? Lee Holloway, one of my co-founders, was the technical genius behind CloudFlare and wrote the vast majority of the code. I built the first version of our front end and some other random bits of code along the way. The last bit of my code that is left is around our Always Online feature. If you look at how it handles background AJAX requests to see if the site has come back online and think, "That's janky," now you know why.
Hey Matt, What exactly is happening in your system to trigger a domain to bypass CloudFlare (in case of an attack)? Is there a pps limit? Is there a gbps limit? Also, if you enable the DDoS protection page in a reasonable amount of time (e.g. by checking cpu load and calling the api if it's high with a script ran by cron every minute) would you ever risk to get disabled? For free/pro accounts, the criteria is when the attack starts to negatively affect other customers. That threshold really depends on the circumstances of the attack. If, for instance, an attack is very regionalized and only hitting one data center then it actually is more likely to cause issues than if it is distributed. That makes it difficult to give hard and fast thresholds. For business/enterprise accounts, we have a policy of keeping them on the system no matter what. We have gone to pretty extraordinary lengths to keep biz/ent customers online under large attacks.
How do you manage to keep so active on social media while keeping up with all of your other management duties? Does your team sometimes post as you? Ha. No, no one else posts as me (@eastdakota). I don't post as @CloudFlare -- that's Damon on our team who was our 8th employee and literally invented the position of social media manager once upon a time when he was an early employee at PayPal. For my personal account, I think I tend to post mostly when I'm traveling (usually to complain about United Airlines). If it seems like I'm posting a lot it probably means I'm traveling a lot. Incidentally, still weirds me out a little when people come up to me and say: "I follow you on Twitter."
How did you get some of your first customers? Any strategies you can share? CloudFlare was born, in part, out of Project Honey Pot (Link to www.projecthoneypot.org, an open source project that Lee (@icqheretic) and I started 10+ years ago. CloudFlare's first users were Project Honey Pot members. Our first email to them asked for a helluva leap of faith. Originally, the way you signed up for CloudFlare was by giving us your registrar's username/password. We wrote a little crawler that would login to your registrar, scrape all the DNS info, and then update your name servers. When we first emailed people we didn't have a UI beyond a little box that said something like: "Give us your GoDaddy username/password." It was pretty crazy that people did it, but we'd built a ton of trust with them over the years running PHPot without ever asking for anything in return.
The other fun PHPot story was that when we were first starting we didn't have any money for equipment. Michelle (@zatlyn) suggested that we email all the PHPot users who lived around the Bay Area to see if they had any extra servers. So we did. Emailed about 100 people. Got a ton of replies. Michelle drove around in her little Jetta picking up all the servers. None of them worked, but we were able to take parts from them to cobble together 2 that kind of ran. It was on those two servers we built the first prototype of CloudFlare.
When are we getting a CloudFlare datacenter in India? I know bandwidth is super expensive here but I am guessing you have a lot of users here! India makes Brazil look like a cakewalk. The problem in India is the government and their propensity to pass retroactive taxes on data service providers. There are horror stories of network providers that get hit with tax bills based on "the value of the data" flowing through their networks. That uncertainty makes it very hard. We've actually explored putting a facility in Nepal. It made a lot of sense on paper since the country is within ~5ms of Delhi and has a lot of in-bound traffic, but not a lot of out-bound traffic. Unfortunately, we did the math and our volume of traffic, even just from India, would significantly burden Nepal's infrastructure. We haven't given up on India, but it's a great example of how very physical, old world things impact doing business even as a software/services company.
I hear good things, mostly, all over about CloudFlare. Can you give your top 3 reasons a smaller WordPress blogger should use your services? 1) It's free 2) Faster is always better 3) We work closely with the WordPress team and usually get early word of new vulnerabilities and are able to virtually patch them before they're announced.
Any chance that sub-accounts will ever become a feature? If by sub-accounts you mean the ability for multiple users to manage an account with different permissions then yes. It's coming with the rollout of the new customer site before the end of Q2.
What about transferring a domain to a different CF account? That'll be possible once multi-user is enabled.
What do you think are the biggest threats to the Internet these days? Is it governments, hackers, ourselves, etc.? Government action to "regionalize" the Internet. Brazil's proposal to require local data residency would have made building a modern web company very difficult. - The UN's attempt to take control away from ICANN concerns me. The Internet has always been self-governed by its stakeholders. I'm concerned with the ITU or other governmental organizations stepping in and messing that up. - Concentration of services behind a few giants worries me. The challenges of hackers and ISP fast lanes puts pressure to huddle behind the Google's Amazon's and Facebook's of the world. I think that risks something very special about the Internet. That's part of the motivation of CloudFlare: to give you the resources of a giant without forcing you to live in their walled garden.
This is a more specific question about net neutrality: What do you think about ISP's charging Netfliz for bandwidth? There's an expression in the law that hard cases make bad law. Netflix is a hard case, so it's hard to generalize from them. At their peak they are responsible for 30% of Internet bandwidth in the United States. That's enough that it imposes real costs on ISPs who have to install new routers, upgrade their backbones, etc. Those costs are real and so the dispute is really over who should have to pay for them. If the cost is imposed on the ISP then they'll, in turn, pass them on to customers. That doesn't seem fair to someone like me who isn't a Netflix subscriber. On the other hand, the ISP's customers are paying the ISP to access any service online, Netflix included. It's a tricky problem.
A lot of the problem comes from the fact that the market developed with all-you-can-eat/flat-fee pricing. That means low bandwidth users end up subsidizing high bandwidth users. You'd probably have a lot fewer market distortions like Netflix if end users paid on a usage basis. Of course, that's an unpopular option, and it's hard to imagine how you transition from one model to the other, but it would be easier for ISPs to get behind network neutrality if they knew they could bake costs of services like Netflix into their pricing. And, incidentally, it's not clear that, over time, customers would be worse off.
(I recognize there's a significant amount of irony in my suggesting that after, earlier in this conversation, saying that CloudFlare has fixed-rate pricing because people hate the surprises inherent with variable-rate pricing.)
The other thing that's gotten a bit lost in the conversation is that I'd guess Netflix is paying less for bandwidth through Comcast directly than they were via Cogent. People don't object to Netflix paying Cogent, but they do to people paying Comcast. The reason, of course, is that Comcast is a terminating access monopoly. Comcast has a monopoly over the access to all their subscribers (i.e., if Netflix wants to reach a Comcast subscriber, one way or another, they need to pay Comcast). That suggests that even if you have competition among end-user ISPs, the ISPs will still have a lot of market power over content providers.
These are hard problems.
What do you think of the progress of HTTP 2? Will Cloudflare be an earlier supporter of it once it gets released like you have done with SPDY? Yes.
When will Cloudflare have stickers again? I'm dieing to get one ;_; We just got a new order of stickers in. I think Damon is planning on doing a give-away next week. Stay tuned!
Big fan. When are you opening an office in Portland? :) There are a lot of good people here. No plans for a Portland office. We run a data center nearby to handle data processing so we may open something at some point, but we believe it's pretty important to have as much of our team in the same office as possible. San Francisco is pretty nice too if anyone wants to move down.
What were your initial reactions to the Spamhaus incident that happened a long time ago? I was Spamhaus's attorney very briefly once upon a time, so I've known that team for a while. When their website got knocked down we were happy to help. At first the attacks were big but nothing out of the ordinary. I was out to dinner (on a date) when the big volume. My reaction was: "300Gbps?! Shit. How's the network holding up?" Good news was we'd designed the network to handle quite a bit more traffic. That said, based on how the attack was launched, it was easy to see how the attacker could have scaled it another 10x+. That would have been very bad, and not just for us. Thankfully, while the size of attacks has continued to grow, we're still within an order of magnitude of what Spamhaus saw.
Do you have statistics on the amount of requests that are served over IPv6? How is IPv6 usage growing over time for you? Also, thanks for your work to encourage the usage of IPv6, including the free gateway. We do, but I don't have them at hand. Martin Levy (@mahtin) on our team is working on a blog post where we'll be sharing them. There's been a marked uptick in IPv6 over the last 6 months, which is great news.
Hey Matthew, First off, I love your service and I am enjoying it every day. But how did you manage to go from a small startup to where you are today? Secondly, my cat says meow. Or something like that. One step at a time. I still think of us as a small startup. I walk into the office regularly and still think: where'd all these people come from. I think there's a fiction that startups often have a silver bullet that explains their success. Think about Facebook. There's nothing on its own that is so amazing about Facebook. For them to have built what they did was a million good, small decisions. Then, one day, they woke up and they were huge. There's nothing I can point to as a silver bullet in our story either. We've tried to make a million good, small decisions and tackle problems as they come up. One thing I've learned is that it takes as much effort to solve a big, daunting problem (like CloudFlare) as it does to solve something that seems more manageable. In some ways, big, gnarly problems are actually easier because they attract really smart people to help work on them. And, I don't have a cat, but if I did it would say meow right back.
What do you use to monitor your servers all around the world? We use a combination of open source tools like Nagios as well as a number of things we've developed internally -- although those too are usually build on open source tools like OpenTSDB and SystemTap. Our SRE team is amazing to keep everything running as we are growing as quickly as we are.
Also, must say I love the blog, it's a great insight. The blog has been a real surprise. If you go back and read the early posts it started out much more like a traditional marketing blog. At some point we started writing more technical posts and they really resonated. Some of the posts that get the most readers are those that are the most technical. We encourage our engineering team to talk about what they're working on.
What were some of the challenges you faced when starting up CloudFlare in the beginning? If you could sum up the first few years of CloudFlare in one word, what would it be? Everyone thought we were crazy. "You're going to get people to switch their DNS to you, route their traffic through you, and you're going to do it by shipping equipment to locations around the world?! You're nuts." I saw someone Tweet the other day that every entrepreneur's superpower is naivety. I think that's right. Had we known all of what was really involved in building CloudFlare I don't think we'd have ever gotten started. But I'm glad we did and enjoy coming to work every day to build something that is literally help build a better Internet.
How do you explain the recent hoarding of your latest IP range assigned, when static IPs aren't required for websites at this point, making the SSL point moot? We have millions of customers, so it's not a surprise we've got a lot of IPs. We're going to make SSL available to all our customers, even free ones. That will end up chewing up a bunch of IP addresses. Getting a large allocation of IPs was one of the last stumbling blocks we needed to overcome before we could do that. We just received a /12 from ARIN, so that plan is moving forward. I can't think of any other company that uses IPs as efficiently as we do. We've also been a big proponent of IPv6, so we're doing what we can to help with the transition to the future.
You've really taken a lot of the last /8... Wonder how you justified that as '3 months' usage with the current state of IP affairs. And, PS, Akamai just got a /10.
Hey Matthew ! First of all thank you for the good tools you providing. I would like to know how did you come up with this idea ? Can you tell us more about your two previous start-up ? Was them totally different from CF? The first startup I worked for wasn't my idea. I was the first non-founder employee. It was completely different: an online health benefits brokerage based in Chicago. It was actually a lot like Zenefits, which is a new hot startup doing the same thing 15 years later. I learned a ton in the process.
My second startup is Unspam Technologies. It was in the anti-spam space and is still around (and profitable!) today. I still serve on the Board and Lee (@icqheretic), one of my co-founders at CloudFlare, was our first non-founder employee at Unspam.
Any server in Portugal soon? We've talked with some Portuguese ISPs about putting in what we call mini-PoPs directly into their data centers. That'll likely happen before the end of 2014. Madrid is coming even sooner: likely by the end of Q2 or early Q3.
Matthew, congratulations on the success of Cloudflare -- it's been fun to watch it grow. Here's my question: Cloudflare took the lead on Heartbleed and worked in a very open way with other companies and individuals to determine the risks of the defect and how to validate if your site was affected. Cloudflare also helped the NYT deal with a denial of service attack from the SEA about a year ago. That's part of what seems to be an ethos of "it's all of us against the bad guys" ethos in the security community. Do you see that cooperation continuing even though in some circumstances it may not be to the short-term benefit of some companies to "help" their competitors solve problems? I hope so. I really dislike the FUD marketing that many old-school security companies engage in. What I'm proud of is that the adjectives that our customers most often describe us with are "smart" and "helpful." We try and keep an ethos across the whole company of never saying: "That's not our problem." It means our support team spends a bunch of time helping people write their Apache configs and other things that don't directly have to do with us. The upshot, however, is that when the NYT comes under attack, we're someone the CTO trusts to call and help out.
What's your favorite color? Hmm. Not sure. I just painted my apartment and everything ended up being some shade of gray. That's such a boring answer. Probably something in the cool tones: blue or green more than red, orange or pink. Although... I do like CloudFlare Orange. (But CloudFlare's logo was almost blue: Link to blog.cloudflare.com)
Clouflare Brazil DataCenter, when? Brazil doesn't make doing business there easy. We've had equipment sitting in customs for 3+ months. What my team didn't tell me when we started the Brazil project is that if Brazil customs denies your equipment entry then they burn it. Glad I didn't know when I approved the PO. The other thing that is a pain about Brazil is there's a 100% import duty on all equipment sent there. That means it's 2x the cost to turn up servers in Brazil as it is almost anywhere else in the world. Good news: equipment cleared customs and, last I heard, it was in the process of being racked. Barring something unexpected, Sao Paulo will be online before the end of the month.
Hey there! Whats the biggest attack you have ever mitigated? The biggest one we've talked about publicly was just shy of 400Gbps. We've seen a few others that have been bigger than that, but nothing yet that's crossed 500Gbps. I think it's inevitable we will sometime in the next 12 months.
What's one business offshoot you wanted to pursue with cloudflare but couldn't because of whatever reason? I wanted to create a Gmail alternative to compete with Google. Start with a solid mobile app. Build crypto and security in from the beginning. Notify when your messages were passing over a non-secure SMTP session. Monetize on a simple per-seat basis rather than through ads. I think there are a lot of big companies adopting Google Apps but not excited about it. That feels like a market opportunity.
I wanted to create a stock exchange that leveled the playing field and limited access to high frequency traders. Potentially even go back to fractional share pricing to give margin back to stock brokers and encourage market research. Was interesting to read Michael Lewis's new book ("Flash Boys") and see that someone is actually trying it.
About a year ago, you told me Kanye West's Stronger was a good song to describe the success of Cloudflare. Considering the last year's experience, would you say that is still an accurate sentiment or would another song better describe it? Well, Kayne threatened to sue us because Coinye (the parody crypto coin) was a customer. Can't decide if that makes me more or less likely to do a CloudFlare remix of Stronger.
You guys dropped some hints on your blog about a new website with new analytics etc, any ETA on that ? We've been testing a whole new customer website for the last 6 months. Our plan is to begin rolling out the beta over the next few weeks and have it out broadly by the end of the quarter (June). The first version won't have a completely new Analytics frontend, but we're working on the design for that and should roll it out in Q3.
Is your system going to get less annoying? Got nothing but errors from CloudFare stockholm over the past couple of days. Submit a ticket with the RayID and we can figure out what's going on. No known problems in Stockholm recently.
CloudFlare recently took away the ability for people to run CF on top of Incapsula's service, in essence proxying over a proxy and utilizing two CDNs at once. Now this situation, which previously worked fine for a long time, results in an error, "DNS points to prohibited IP". What gives? If it doesn't cause a problem why block it? Link to blog.cloudflare.com
Submit a ticket and we'll figure it out. That said, proxying through multiple proxies is probably not a good idea.
What's brown and sticky? Rice from Koh Sumoi and the Monkey, the Thai place near our office in San Francisco. ;-)
When will you accept PayPal payments? You've said for so long you will accept this but still nothing. Thanks. I promise it's still something we're working on. A complete rework of billing is scheduled for Q3. That will include PayPal (and Bitcoin).
And, ps, don't think you're alone in being frustrated in how long it's taken. Kills me.
Cloudflare blog mentioned SSL will be available for free customers, any schedule or eta at the moment? We're shooting for end of Q2/beginning of Q3.
Is CloudFlare committed to keep the free plan for ever and never charge? Yes.
Do you have any plans for mainland china in the future. We use one of the big chinese cdns and the service is terrible. I think there is a big market for global CDN that could offer ICP approved services like ChinaCache. Stay tuned.
Last updated: 2014-05-06 16:35 UTC
This post was generated by a robot! Send all complaints to epsy.
submitted by tabledresser to tabled [link] [comments]

Building Bitcoin Websites - YouTube Bitcoin: How Cryptocurrencies Work - YouTube Coffee, Crypto, and Cannabis Stocks with the Bitcoin Block Bully Wences Casares Explains Bitcoin ₿ IOHK Joins Hyperledger, CBDC’s, Block.One Voice Launch & Brave Browser YouTube Killer

Chicago’s Cook County to Test Bitcoin Blockchain-Based Public Records Submitted October 06, 2016 at 11:48PM by tylev via reddit Bitcoin derivatives, particularly perpetual swaps on BitMEX, are surging in popularity in 2019, with the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) and other Bitcoin derivatives platforms (i.e., BitMEX) all recording record or near-record volumes in the last few months. For context, BitMEX has consistent 24-hour BTC futures volumes around $2 billion — overall can reach $10 billion in volume per day ... The first is the fact that Chicago Mercantile Exchange’s monthly Bitcoin futures contracts are set to expire at the end of this week (December 27th, to be exact), despite it being a week of holiday celebration. Yes, Bitcoin futures are cash-settled, meaning that the coins backing the contracts don’t actually exist on the blockchain, though analysts say the settlement of these derivatives ... The government had identified bitcoin addresses on the bitcoin blockchain linked to transactions with the illicit site. The government then subpoenaed a major U.S. cryptocurrency exchange for its records to identify the owners associated with those addresses, one of which was Gratkowski, who later argued that the government’s recovery of the bitcoin transaction information was ... — Duck Block (@duckblo) December 5, 2018 “Fundamentally, in order for one Bitcoin to cost at least something, it must have an intrinsic value apart from a pure speculative interest,” Kit explained. “For now, this value comes from censorship-free transactions. Today, Bitcoin solves the drastic problem of private value transfers for those who could not perform them before due to ...

[index] [43474] [9315] [31357] [45314] [48334] [24066] [25449] [35184] [25482] [42424]

Building Bitcoin Websites - YouTube

Cardano’s IOHK, 7 Other Joins Hyperledger For Cross-Industry Blockchain Technologies. Fed Paper: Central Bank Digital Currencies Could Click "SHOW MORE" for Additional Info. & Disclosures ... The Bitcoin Halving 2020 happened excactly as intended at blockheight 630'000. The Bitcoin block reward got reduced by 50% to 6.25 BTC per block. What does this mean for Bitcoin miners and what is ... Coffee and Crypto with the Bitcoin Block Bully - Duration: 1:32:13. Chicago Crypto Hustler 95 views. 1:32:13. A Global Recession Is Coming...How Will It Affect Bitcoin? - Duration: 12:22. Crypto ... Use Blockchain API to Calculate Time Until Next Bitcoin Block Halving by m1xolyd1an. 9:10 . Blockchain Receive Payments API v2 HD BIP32 xpub by m1xolyd1an. 11:36. How to Use Blockchain Receive ... Review of the Cryptocurrency Market and A select few Cannabis Stocks Subscribe Like and Share if this was helpful Follow me on IG I Follow back https://www.i...

#